Art Lovers



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The Tel aviv Museum of Art was established in 1932, before the establishment of the State of Israel, in the building that was the home of Meir Dizengoff, Tel Aviv's first mayor and in 1971 moved to it's current location on King Saul Avenue. The Museum is home to an extensive collection of both classical and contemporary art, with a clear emphasis on Israeli art, a sculpture garden and youth wing.
The Museum is situated in the cultural centre of the city- the Golda Meir Cultural and Art Center, where it sits alongside the Israeli Opera and Musical Theatre. The Tel Aviv Museum of Art is a hub of activity for the local arts scene and aside from it's collections, presents music, dance and film performances, as well as lectures on philosophy and art. There is also a fully-computerized art library on site that serves thousands of students, scholars and curators every year. The Museum is, without a doubt, the most comprehensive reference centre in the Middle East.
The Museum's permanent collection displays some of the leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century, as well as many of the major movements of modern art; Fauvism, German Expressionism, Cubism and Futurism, to name just a few. French art, such as Impressionists and the School of Paris, alongside key works of Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro's Surrealist creations are all displayed in the Museum.
The temporary exhibitions of individual artist's work and group shows around a common theme are a huge attraction at the Museum, offering a glimpse into the dynamic and vibrant Israeli world of art.
The Museum is also home to a small cinema- the Tel Aviv Museum Cinema- that screens foreign films which are usually highly-praised by the critics. Be sure to check that the film has English subtitles.
The Museum offers guided tours in English every Wednesday at 11:30.
 




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The Ilana Goor Museum is located in a building in the city of Jaffa that, 250 years ago, served as a hostel for Jewish pilgrims who were on their way to Jerusalem. The world-renowned artist, Ilana Goor, took it upon herself to restore this magnificent building to it's former beauty, preserving the beauty of the architecture of the building's era and simultaneously injecting the place with the vibrancy of the modern art that has gained her world-wide fame.
Ilana Goor was born in Tiberias, Israel to a family of doctors, many of whom were artists. She never studied art formally, developing her style along with her technique and resulting in powerful, emotion-filled works. Ilana has statues that are displayed in public places all around Israel as well as in private collections. She has presented exhibitions world-wide, currently has her work displayed in sixteen designer showrooms in the United States and sells her jewelry, clothing and furniture collections all over the world.
The museum presents a wide selection of Ilana's works as well as those of other Israeli and international  artists. The museum is the embodiment of everything that Ilana believes in- the fusion of old with new, the combination of rural and industrial, the mixing of organic an geometrical; all effortlessly and in perfect unification.
The Ilana Goor Museum has an usually homey feeling about it and when one learns that the Museum is, in fact, part of Ilana Goor's house, this comes as no surprise. The stunning art pieces; sculptures, jewelry, furniture, paintings and more, are thoughtfully placed around the magnificent building and the incredible view of the sea, visible through every window, simply adds to the invigorating breath of fresh-air that is the Ilana Goor Museum.
There is a rooftop café on the premises with a breath-taking view of the Mediterranean Sea, as well as a gift shop.
 




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Tel aviv, the busy metropolis in the center of Israel, was named as a World Cultural Heritage Site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2003 thanks to the four-thousand plus Bauhaus-style buildings that grace the White City zone of Tel Aviv, known as such due to the predominantly white and pastel-colored buildings along, in the main, Rothschild Boulevard, Dizengoff Circle and Bialik Street. UNESCO noted that the White City presents a wonderful example of town planning and architecture in the early twentieth century as modern architectural trends that originate from around the world are successfully adapted and integrated into the traditions of the city.
In the 1920s, the rapidly-changing city was lacking, decided city officials, a collective architectural style. A large number of architect graduates immigrated in the thirties to Tel Aviv and brought with them the Modernist style of architecture that they had learnt in Germany. The international style was known for it's asymmetric lines, minimalist approach and lack of useless decorations. Interior design is simple and functional.  Perhaps more than anything, the ever-present balconies set Tel Aviv apart from other cities, creating a sense of community as socializing is simply a matter of peering across to one's neighbors' balcony.
For the visitor to Tel Aviv who wishes to visit one of the notable 830 sites on UNESCO's famous list that are said to be invaluable to human culture as a whole, be sure to make your way to the White City zone of Tel Aviv. Tel Aviv's first boulevard, Rothschild Boulevard, has a large number and variety of intriguing buildings. The street is a literal piece of architectural art and provides the chance for visitors to savor the unique fusion of old and new that makes Tel Aviv the exciting place it is.
 




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The Rubin Museum (known in Hebrew as Bet Reuven) is the house-turned museum of the painter Reuven Rubin, situated in the heart of Tel aviv.
Reuven Rubin was one of the very first Israeli artists who gained world-wide recognition. Rubin was born in 1893 in Romania and  immigrated to Israel at the beginning of the twentieth century in order to study in the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem.
Rubin lived, together with his family, in this house on 14 Bialik Street from the year 1945 until he died in 1974 and bestowed the house to the city of Tel Aviv. Just under a decade after his death, the house was opened to the public as a museum.
The Museum displays a collection of Reuven Rubin's paintings that are occasionally replaced by guest exhibitions that focus on the early period of Israeli art. The Museum consists of four floors; at basement level there is a new children's workshop that opens up to the backyard, at street level the main gallery, entry hall and the  Museum's shop, the second floor is home to an additional gallery as well as a library and reading room and the third floor is where Rubin's own studio is preserved as it was during his lifetime. The third floor also contains a biographical journey into Rubin's life story through photographs, documents and sketches.
The Rubin Museum makes for a quiet and charming visit into Reuven Rubin's life, works and legacy.
 



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